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Screech

I gagged, but only because I have a flu. Well written and easy to understand. As my head clears I may have more to say...

tom sheepandgoats

Thanks. I'll be waiting for it.

Awake In Rochester

Why do bad things happen? That's what I am asking now. I'm not sure if you still live in Rochester, but we have had a 36 car pile up yesterday. (You can read about it in my blog). Many were injured, 5 are still in the hospital. One young lady is in critical condition with a broken neck. The teen who died was 17, an aspiring musician, a volunteer at Highland Hospital and a honor student. At times like this I wounder "why do bad things happen." at least here on earth.

tom sheepandgoats

AIR:

I knew about the accident but only read the full report via your blog.

When similar tragedies happen to our people (one recently did; a young man killed in a hunting accident. I think another guy, who saw rustling afar and blasted away, is being charged with manslaughter) we take comfort in knowing we will see each other again when the resurrection occurs. When God's Kingdom rules on earth, we expect there to be a general resurrection, in keeping with such thoughts as Acts 24:15 and John 5:20. This helps soften some of the sting of death, even when caused by "time and chance." (Eccles 9:11) Or, as 1 Thes 4:13 puts it: "Brothers, we do not want you to be ignorant about those who fall asleep, or to grieve like the rest of men, who have no hope."

Don't misunderstand. "Normal" death is not natural to humans, let alone tragic accidental death. The resurrection hope doesn't eliminate the grieving process and the gamut of emotions from denial to anger to sadness; it just shows "light at the end of the tunnel."

Ideally, the bereaved family has a support system. Many people flood them with attention now, but several months down the road will be as important.

Moristotle

Dear Tom and readers of Tom: I am up and about and collecting my thoughts, still amazed at myself for not having had the courtesy to pussyfoot about a bit rather than expressing my nearly literal reaction to reading Tom's religious explanation for why bad things happen and what Adam and Eve had to do with it.

Tom, have you read my today's post titled "The miracle" (at http://moristotle.blogspot.com/2008/02/miracle.html
Do you understand the distinction between "modernist" and "post-modernist"? If you do, please try to explain it to me! (Or anyone else who reads that post and this question. Thanks.)

Screech

Now that my head is clear, I appreciate your writing more.

I'll compare it to the American Civil War. During 1861-1865, the Confederate States of America (CSA) had control over their territory to do as they wished. Once the USA regained control, they lost that ability.

Granted, it isn't a perfect comparison, but the analogy is that the CSA was able to do as they wished, for ill or good, until their authority was taken back. In a sense, mankind in rebellion has authority to do as they wish, until it is reclaimed by Jehovah.

Will mankind be allowed to rebel again? No. Once the matter is settled, there will be ample precedent to simply execute those who would rebel in the future. Thus the quote, "and there will be a great tribulation such as has not occurred before nor will there occur again." By endangering our planet and own well-being as a species with our greed, it can be argued that we are indeed bringing about those days ourselves, and even then God cannot be blamed. "In fact, if those days weren't cut short, no flesh would be spared." I wonder what it will be like...

Moristotle

Gee, has it been a whole week since I said (on February 12), "I am up and about and collecting my thoughts"? I trust no one thinks I'm still trying to do that and not succeeding.

At the time I was thinking that I probably needed to say something as a rebuttal (or at least a comeback) to Tom's narrative of humankind's not having been "designed with the ability to 'rule' ourselves." But my mind is clear enough now to realize that nothing of the sort is needed (or even possible). I can only observe that Tom's axioms of creation and design are privileged (as acts of faith) and therefore untouchable.

The only thing that might conceivably touch them is a change in Tom's faith, which gives no appearance (at least insofar as I'm privy) of ever changing.

That seems to work for Tom and I'm glad for him. I don't think he's suffering as a result of it, and I don't think he's causing anyone else to suffer either. I've pretty much accepted his characterization of Jehovah's Witnesses as non-political and only passively resistant, and he seems to be a worthy exemplar of that--even admirable, given all the guff he has to put up with from non-believers.

My hat's off to him, certainly.

Awake In Rochester

Hi Tom,

Thanks for the uplifting response. I guess I was just a bit down concerning the accident. Sometimes it's easy to ask why, but your not necessary looking for the answer. It can also be an emotional response to an unexpected tragedy.

tom sheepandgoats

And of course, many times the wisest course is to not try to explain anything, but just to listen.

Thanks for your response.

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